OUR STORIES

Latest Updates

Protecting The Red-Tailed Phascogale In Katanning

Blog Post - Protecting The Red-Tailed Phascogale In Katanning.

The Red-Tailed Phascogale (Phascogale calura) was once wide-spread across southern Australia, but is now limited to a 'triangle' in south-west WA. Loss of habitat (wandoo / sheoak woodland) and predation by feral and domestic cats have been catastrophic for the species. It is listed as Endangered under the EPBC Act.

Thanks to dedicated efforts by a number of conservation groups and individuals over the past decade, the future for Red-Tailed Phascogales is improving. Community awareness has increased, as have sightings (including breeding reports). However, there is still a long way to go to protect this iconic arboreal mammal. The aim of this FNPW funded project is to continue to raise awareness, improve the availability of nesting / breeding spaces and to reduce predation by cats.

The project builds on significant work by Katanning Landcare, Wagin-Woodanilling Landcare, Bush Heritage Australia, the South West Catchments Council and Wheatbelt NRM over many years - projects which have included awareness raising, environmental fencing, revegetation, predator control, nest box construction and installation and community reporting. An on-line Phascogale Nest Box Monitoring Survey portal has been developed and will continue to be used for community members to monitor and report usage of their nest boxes - giving important data on distribution and population.

The specific activities chosen for this project look at what the community currently needs and has capacity to achieve - more nest boxes built, cat predation highlighted (which hasn't been tackled directly in Katanning before) and the continued education of local children.

Donate here to support this and other FNPW Threatened Species projects.

Fundraising

Help create a NEW 60,000 hectare National Park to protect half a billion years of history

Your donation will enable FNPW to connect habitat and protect endangered native animals Find out more...