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PROJECTS

This map shows FNPW's recently funded projects.

Click the map markers to find out more.

Backyard Buddies

Project focus
Environment education

Project partners
FNPW

Location
Australia wide

You might have received a call from a Backyard Buddies' telemarketer. They sell soft toys and take donations to raise funds for the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife.

But did you know that Backyard Buddies is also FNPW's environmental education program?

We say: Backyard Buddies are the native plants and animals that share our built-up areas, waterways, backyards and parks.

Backyard Buddies are also the people who value native wildlife and want to protect it.

So you can be a backyard buddy.

Visit backyardbuddies.org.au to find out more, and to sign up to a free monthly e-newsletter called B-mail. It's about native animals you're likely to see in your backyard each month, and provides simple tips on how to make your backyard a friendlier, safer and more inviting space for native animals.

It's so much fun to see native animals up close, and there's a lot you can do to encourage them at your place.

It isn't difficult. All it takes is a few small additions, and you can see a huge increase in your very own Backyard Buddies.

Transform your backyard into a habitat haven

  • Add mulch - to encourage bugs which make great food for birds
  • Add rocks and logs - to give skinks and frogs somewhere to hide
  • Add a bird bath - as clean, fresh water will attract many buddies
  • Add a nest box - to give a great home to a bird or mammal family
  • Add locally native plants - as this provides excellent food, shelter, and nest sites
  • Add an understory - to give small birds somewhere to hide in the shrubs and plants that grow under trees but above your groundcovers
  • Add a frog pond - as frogs will love it, and other buddies will love a drink and a splash
  • Add a cat run, or keep your cat indoors - to keep your backyard buddies safe

And you don't have to do it all at once!

Your backyard buddies will appreciate any improvements you make, and it's awesome to watch your backyard evolving over time.

But one thing is for sure - if you build it, they will come.

What other conservation work does FNPW support?

Find out more

Community stocks Koala larder

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & Redland City Council

Location
South-East Queensland

Over 140 volunteers plant over 3200 seedlings including 300 koala food source trees across 3 parklands at 5 events in 4 months thanks to the supporters of FNPW’s Plant a Tree for Me initiative.

Volunteers at work planting over 3200 seedlings

Listed as ‘vulnerable’ the Koala Coast Koala is one of Australia’s most significant koala populations. However, living in this urban environment has taken its toll.

Since 1996 Koala numbers have declined by 80% due to habitat loss and fragmentation, disease, car strikes and dog attacks. With FNPW funding an ongoing partnership between Redland City Council, the community and the Koala Bushcare Group has seen a series of community tree planting events, providing a proactive way for people to directly help Koalas and other local wildlife.

Covering 1000m2 new and 2000m2 of enhanced Koala habitat the plantings will link remnant Koala habitat areas and enlarge existing bushland areas. Redland City Council will maintain these areas with waterings and weed maintenance ensuring they grow into mature forests.

The 300 food trees are planted on fertile coastal soil so Koalas can start feeding on them in as little as 5 years. They’ll become an important additional food source.

The project’s aim is to increase and link the habitat in urban areas, with the intention of increasing survival rates of Koalas. Through these tree planting events and associated advertising, increased awareness is raised within the community providing an important role in education, engagement and in spreading the conservation message.

 

The enthusiasm of the volunteers enthusiasm has been instrumental in the success of the project and with ongoing support future projects like this can continue not only in Queensland but right across this great land we call home.

Preserving, increasing and connecting habitat is essential for the survival of the Redland City Council population of Koala Coast Koalas in Queensland.

Visit plantatreeforme.org.au to plant a tree today!

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join in community plantings and conservation projects throughout our National & Regional Parks.

FNPW have been funding and supporting koala conservation projects for many years, including:

NSW

The impact of bushfires on koalas.
Research on the movement of Koalas back into severely burnt forest.
Koala tree choice research.
Research into whether Port Macquarie is a koala genetic hotspot?
Southern Highlands koala satellite tracking and conservation.

QLD

Community tree plantings for koalas.

VIC

Otway koala habitat research.

Improving survival rates for translocation of Koalas.

NATIONAL

The Great Koala Count citizen science project.

Conserving Kangaroo Island's Endangered Bandicoots

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & SA Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources

Location
Kangaroo Island, South Australia

Thanks to your support, the endangered Southern Brown Bandicoots of Kangaroo Island are the focus of increased conservation efforts. Research provides the knowledge required to help this endangered species recover. The local community is encouraged help through collecting citizen science observations, and participating in small mammal surveys. Before this project, the Southern Brown Bandicoot was thought to be in decline. Now they have the conservation attention they need.

Convict Cottage

Project focus
Cultural heritage

Project partners
FNPW & NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service

Location
Gogerly's Cottage, Royal National Park, New South Wales

To showcase the oldest building in Sydney's Sutherland Shire, FNPW and our supporters provided $15,000 in funding to create information panels for visitors and to improve walking track access to the site at the surrounding Royal National Park. Ex-convict, Charles Gogerly lived in the cottage from 1853 which is where the name Gogerly's Cottage comes from. The house itself is believed to have been built prior to 1840. The cottage is an impressive display of early, sophisticated architecture and style for such a remote part of Sydney.

 

Ensuring Tassie Devil Survival Through Captive Breeding

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & Devil Ark

Location
Barrington Tops, New South Wales

Thanks to your support, endangered Tasmanian Devils are being returned from the brink of extinction through captive breeding efforts on the Australian mainland, where there is no risk of infection from diseased wild devils. It's estimated that there are less than 10% of Tasmanian Devils left in the wild, due to the transmissible Devil Facial Tumour Disease. Before, Tasmanian Devils were facing extinction. Now, a viable, stable insurance population will grow, and allow for genetically diverse devils to be released back in Tasmania in the future.

Expanding Christmas Island's Reptile Captive Breeding Facilities

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & Parks Australia: Christmas Island National Park

Location
Christmas Island

Thanks to your support, reptile species only found on Christmas Island are being saved from extinction through a captive breeding program established in 2009. Since then, FNPW and our supporters have funded two projects in 2013 and 2015 to house the growing reptile populations.

The building of a new reptile housing facility and the construction of eight predator-proof enclosures on the island, funded by a FNPW grant in 2013. The facilities allowed endemic skink and gecko populations to increase, safe from introduced predators like cats, centipedes and wolf snakes. The enclosures hold up to 1,000 skinks. 

Christmas Island National Park’s captive breeding facility is known as the Lizard Lodge. The enclosures of the Lizard Lodge hold almost every blue-tailed skink and Lister’s gecko known to exist. There’s a much smaller breeding population at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo, but this facility, in the lizards’ native environment, represents their last, best hope for survival.

The enclosure taking shape

Christmas Island was once home to five endemic reptiles, but today it’s quite possible that only one of these species survives in the wild. What is known is that small-island populations are hit hard by introduced pests and diseases. Prior to the late 1880s, people rarely visited remote Christmas Island, and never permanently settled. But when people eventually did stay to mine the island’s phosphate, they brought with them a range of invasive hitchhikers. After millions of years evolving in isolation, the island’s endemic reptiles suddenly had company. Five new non-native reptiles arrived, among them the voracious wolf snake, as well as a cadre of other aggressors, including yellow crazy ants and giant centipedes.

The Lizard Lodge was built in 2014 as a safe place for the remaining lizards, with enclosures free from predation and carefully furnished to make the inhabitants feel at home. Since 2009, these captive populations have dramatically increased and now can’t all be held within the existing facilities. The expansion project was undertaken in 2015 with funding from FNPW. Within each tank are arranged sticks, rocks and sheets of bark for the lizards to lounge upon. There are also small wooden boxes, about the size of a deck of cards, crafted to mimic the nooks and crannies of the island’s porous limestone.  

The finished building

Local community and tourists have been involved through educational, photography, and volunteering activities. Before this expansion, captive populations had reached a peak number that could be protected within the existing facilities. Now new enclosures mean reptile populations can continue to grow and, once threats have been mitigated, they'll be released into the wild.

Fox-proofing Manly's Endangered Penguin Colony

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service

Location
Manly, New South Wales

Thanks to your support, the breeding colony of Little Penguins on the NSW mainland will be better protected from foxes. The purchase of motion sensing cameras, a thermal camera, fox-deterrent lighting and nest boxes will help this endangered population recover after a vicious fox attack in 2015 killed 27 penguins. The local community rallied to support this important work, donating $20,000 to FNPW's crowdfunding campaign to fox-proof the Manly Penguins. Before, the penguins were at risk from fox predation. Now, they can increase their numbers in safety.

Garner's Beach Cassowary Rehabilitation Centre Project

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & Rainforest Rescue

Location
Garner's Beach, North Queensland

Thanks to your support, funding burdens to feed and care for three sick and injured orphan Cassowary chicks for at least three months were lifted. This allowed the only Cassowary rehabilitation centre to remain open. Southern Cassowaries are endangered and as few as 2,000 remain in the wild. Encroaching development means that cassowaries are more frequently the victims of car strikes, dog attacks, and diseases, and orphaned chicks can starve. Before, the centre was at risk of closing down. Now, it can keep rehabilitating Cassowaries, including these special young chicks.

In Australia the bird is listed as endangered; most tallies put the number of cassowaries around 1,500 to 2,000. But these are guesstimates: No one knows for sure. The trouble is, cassowaries are hard to count. They live alone, in dense forests.

Cassowary males and females look pretty much the same when they're young, but females eventually grow about a foot taller, reaching some six feet. They start breeding at age 4 or 5 and can live 40 years or more. The birds are solitary aside from brief encounters during the breeding season. Females abandon their one-pound eggs soon after laying them, and males build a rudimentary nest on the forest floor and incubate up to five eggs for almost two months. After chicks hatch, they follow the male for six to nine months as he protects them from predators such as wild pigs and dogs, and guides them to fruit trees within a home range several hundred acres in size. Scientists studying cassowary scat have identified the seeds of 300 plant species, making the bird a key player in spreading rain-forest plants over great distances.


 

 

 

Green Parrot Assisted Breeding Project

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & Parks Australia

Location
Phillip Island

The Ark now has a nursery

Phillip Island is considered an ‘ark’ for threatened species conservation. With FNPW’s support, it’s goal is to become the benchmark for habitat rehabilitation and translocation of the endangered Norfolk Island Green Parrot.

In 2013 and 2015 FNPW proudly funded the Green Parrot Assisted Breeding Project with Parks Australia. The project initiated an extensive effort to save the Norfolk Island Green Parrot from extinction and has been met with international attention and gained exposure as one of Australia's most successful threatened species programs. 
32 Norfolk Island Green Parrot chicks have successfully fledged from seven purpose built nest sites which were established in 2013. This is such a promising result considering the population in October 2013 was estimated at 46-92 individual birds.

Part of the recovery program includes a translocation to Phillip Island, the small 190 hectare island, 6km off the south coast and part of the Norfolk Island National Park. Uninhabited by humans it will provide a safe haven for the endangered Norfolk Island Green Parrot, free from predators such as cats and rats.

To be successful in the long term, the rehabilitation of Phillip Island's vegetation needed to be intensified and the establishment of a fully functioning nursery on-site was the next step for planned revegetation programs. It is envisaged that an increased vegetation cover and habitat rehabilitation will improve the opportunities for successful colonisation and breeding of the green parrot on Phillip Island and also benefit the 10 seabird and 2 reptile species listed as threatened on the EPBC.

After successfully applying for further funding in 2015 from FNPW, the hard work began by National Parks staff, volunteers and contractors to build a new tunnel house, repair an existing shade house and construct a plant "hardening off" area. More than one tonne of equipment was delivered by boat to Phillip Island and carried up the cliff to the top of the island where the nursery now stands.

The installation of timed sprinkler systems ensure a constant supply of water when Parks staffs are unable to gain access to the island and a remote camera system is fitted in each tunnel house/shade house to monitor the progress of the plants and the efficiency of the watering system. This is all backed up with a remote system override to switch on the sprinklers in times of need.

The new nursery will enable over 500 native plants to be established on Phillip Island annually and ensure minimum seasonal variation in re-vegetation work. It will also strengthen the quarantine precautions on the island by eliminating the risk of the introduction of soil borne disease.

The first plant germinated was the Phillip Island Chaff Tree, a critically endangered plant found only on Phillip Island.To date, the nursery has also produced good numbers of flax seedlings, a very important plant in halting erosion on the island and likely to be an important food source for the Norfolk Island Green Parrot.

By returning Phillip Island to its previous forested state an enormous opportunity exists in the long term protection of other species such as the Norfolk Robin and the Slender-billed White-Eye while the threats of predators on Norfolk are being addressed.

Viewed as a pilot project, the translocation of the Green Parrot planned for 2017 depends on these seedlings thriving.

Grow strong and propagate! 

Healthy Parks, Healthy People

Project focus
Parks for people

Project partners
National Parks Nationwide

Location
Nationwide Program

Healthy Parks, Healthy People is a global movement that recognises the fundamental connections between human health and environmental health.

Growing scientific evidence and generations of traditional knowledge show that spending time in nature is good for our mind, body and soul. Contact with nature is critical for our physical, mental, social and spiritual health. It has positive effects on our ability to concentrate, learn, solve problems and be creative. It boosts our immune system and helps us relax.

Healthy nature sustains our life, livelihoods and liveability. Conserving parks for present and future generations provides inspirational and therapeutic settings that foster lifelong connections with nature and each other. Parks that are valued and maintained are also fundamental to economic growth and vibrant and healthy communities.

Healthy Parks Healthy People aims to unlock the power of nature and parks for their preventative and restorative health and wellbeing benefits, while conserving biodiversity.

Healthy Parks Healthy People encourages divergent sectors to come together to build healthier communities and tackle the issues facing our planet. The approach encourages those from the health, environment, parks, tourism, community development, education, business and other sectors to work together to provide a better outcome for all.

(source: http://www.hphpcentral.com)

Studies show there is a significant relationship between people's mental health and their local environment. Read beyondblue’s study reviewing Australian and international research - Beyond Blue to Green: The benefits of contact with nature for mental health and well-being.

 

Case Study: Kukundi Nature Playspace

Nature play is a term used to describe the creation of simple play opportunities in the natural environment. It is a global movement, aiming to get kids away from TVs, computers and smartphones, and back playing outside by providing unique nature play experiences for families and children.

In 2016, FNPW partnered with SC Johnson to revitalise the former Kukundi precinct into a Nature Playspace and Trail area in Lane Cove National Park, Sydney. The partnership helped to fund the creation of the Kukundi Nature Playspace and the installation of Nature Play equipment for children.

Kukundi is also home to a Bat crèche, maintained by Sydney Wildlife Service volunteers, for endangered Grey-headed Flying-foxes. The team rehabilitate and release flying-foxes back into their natural habitat.

 

Healthy Park, Healthy People Programs by State

NSW

http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do

https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/npws-self-guided-tours/id665764670?mt=8

SA

http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/parks/Home

https://natureplaysa.org.au/

QLD

https://www.npsr.qld.gov.au/experiences/

VIC

http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/

TAS

http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/index.aspx?base=304

WA

https://parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/activities

NT

https://nt.gov.au/leisure/parks-reserves/find-a-park-to-visit

ACT

https://www.environment.act.gov.au/parks-conservation/parks-and-reserves


Helping Koalas Adapt to New Habitats

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & University of Western Sydney

Location
Great Otway National Park

Thanks to your support, Koalas translocated to new habitats will have better survival rates, due to research into inoculants. These inoculants aim to provide Koalas with the unique gut microbes needed to digest the different defensive chemicals of eucalypts in their new areas. Before this research, over one third of koalas died within twelve months of relocation. Now, the search is underway for an inoculant to help koalas adapt to changed diets, so they can safely be moved from areas in which there are too many of them, to suitable habitats with too few koalas.

Improving Visitor Experiences of the Swan and Canning Rivers

Project focus
Environment education

Project partners
FNPW & WA Department of Parks and Wildlife

Location
Swan and Canning River, Western Australia

Thanks to your support, visitors will gain a better understanding of the natural and cultural values of the Swan and Canning rivers. An interpretation facility will be built in the Swan Canning Riverpark, with signage, art and multimedia to tell the stories of the area and particularly of its Aboriginal heritage. Before, the significant heritage of this area were not communicated to visitors. Now, its stories will be shared and increase the richness of visitor experiences.

In Search of the Enigma Moth

Project focus
Environment education

Project partners
FNPW & SA Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources

Location
Kangaroo Island, South Australia

Thanks to your support, the mysteries of a rare, newly discovered moth are being uncovered and the community are being engaged in conservation at the same time. Before, the community's awareness of the value of insects was low. Now, light will be shed on the newly discovered Enigma Moth and it will raise awareness in the Kangaroo Island Community about the importance of insects in their local environment.

 

Koala Action Group Bushcare Planting

Project focus
Land & water conservation

Project partners
FNPW & Redland City Council

Location
Redlands, Queensland

Thanks to your support, koala habitat in Redlands is increasing through community tree plantings. The plantings extend corridors within which koalas can safely travel, feed, find mates, and raise their young.

Community ownership is encouraged as locals are invited to plant trees and learn about koalas. Before the plantings, fewer Koalas could survive in the area, and were at higher risk of being hit by cars or attacked by dogs as they travelled further afield in search of food. Now their habitats are expanding so they can have a brighter future in the Redlands.

Land for Wildlife Biennial Forum 2015

Project focus
Environment education

Project partners
Commnity Environment Network - Land for Wildlife

Location
Sydney, New South Wales

Thanks to your support, regional volunteers who manage their own land for wildlife were able to strengthen their conservation knowledge and sense of community. By coming together for the "Land for Wildlife" Biennial Forum, volunteers from across New South Wales were able to learn from each other's experiences managing areas for biodiversity and wildlife habitat. Before, volunteers could not celebrate their successes, exchange views, and learn how others solved problems they too faced. Now, these regional volunteers can access and apply the considerable knowledge of their conservation community.

Hope for Granite Island's Disappearing Penguins

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & Flinders University Little Penguin Conservation Project

Location
Troubridge and Granite Islands, South Australia

The Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) is the smallest species of penguin in the world, with an average height of just 33 cms. They are found only on the southern coastlines of Australia and New Zealand. Populations of Little Penguins are facing serious decline. On Granite Island in South Australia, numbers have fallen from 1548 in 2001 to just 22 in 2015.

Many Little Penguin populations are data deficient, so monitoring is a vital ingredient in effective conservation efforts. 

Funding from FNPW supported the installation of twelve bioacoustics automated recorders on Troubridge and Granite Islands in South Australia to determine the effectiveness of the recorders in different conditions. On each island, the recorders were positioned every 50m along one transect that crossed penguin breeding territories. The recorders were set to record for three hours just after nightfall and three hours just before dawn and were left to record every day for two months.

A total of 3132 hours of recordings were successfully collected over the two islands. The number of active nests within 10m of the recorders varied between 1-14 on Troubridge Island and 1-4 on Granite Island. A total of forty-five volunteers (local community and students) participated in field trips to collect the data and helped with penguin census on Granite Island

The Little Penguin monitoring project is an ongoing project. Current and future projects are focusing on (1) the impact of parasites/viruses and (2) environmental changes on the declines of the little penguins, (3) the importance of habitat for little penguin distribution and breeding success, and (4) filling out critical knowledge gaps in little penguin population trends.

 

Mt Schank Walking Trail

Project focus
Cultural heritage

Project partners
FNPW & SA Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources

Location
Mt Schank, South Australia

Thanks to your support, when you visit South Australia's Mount Schank State Heritage Area you can enjoy a new stone path to the volcano rim. Before this new track, the existing stairs did not meet Australian Standards and visitors often climbed beside the stairs instead, which led to erosion and a slipping hazard. Now, the 12,000 or so visitors to Mount Schank each year have a safer, easier walk to experience the incredible 360-degree views at the top.

Ngurrawaana Ranger Habitat Conservation

Project focus
Cultural heritage

Project partners
FNPW & WA Department of Parks and Wildlife

Location
Pilbara, Western Australia

Thanks to Aurizon Community Giving Fund partnering with FNPW and providing $15,000 to a conservation project bringing together a team of local traditional owners with parks staff in order to help threatened species recovery in the Millstream Chichester National Park (MCNP).

This project is helping to control Stinking Passionflower, Passiflora foetida weed within parts of MCNP. Controlling the Stinking Passionflower will help to protect the Pilbara Olive Python's, Morelia olivaceus barroni breeding grounds and the Northern Quoll's, Dasyurus hallucatus habitat and food sources.

The Pilbara Olive Python is listed as Vulnerable under the Federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (1999) and as a species that is Rare or Likely to become Extinct under the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950). The Olive Python is culturally important to the Yindjibarndi people as a traditional food source and through mythological narratives and Law song cycles.

 

The Northern Quoll is Australia’s smallest quoll species and listed as “Endangered” under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (1999). Both Olive Python and Northern Quoll habitat is restricted within the Pilbara region in Western Australia, amongst rocky escarpments and gorges next to permanent or semi-permanent waterholes and rivers. The Olive Python and Northern Quoll populations of the Pilbara are genetically and ecologically important because they are separated from more northern occurrences of these species.They conserve genetic diversity and may be less vulnerable to the spread of the introduced Cane Toad.

 

Stinking Passionflower is a scrambling vine that invades the habitat types utilised by Olive Pythons and Quolls. In these unique environments passionflower can create dense vine ‘mats’ at ground level or climb into vegetation, smothering understorey plants and providing fuel ladders for fires to reach into the canopies of trees. Passionflower has created a significant increase in flammable biomass, making wildfires far more destructive. It also greatly reduces invertebrate diversity and abundance which has the potential to reduce available insect prey for the Northern Quolls.

 

Stinking Passionflower is a climbing or scrambling vine with sticky hairs over most of the plant. Its stems produce tendrils from the bases of the alternately arranged leaves. Its leaves (3-10.5 cm long) usually have three rounded or pointed lobes, but sometimes they can be entire or five-lobed. Its flowers (3-5 cm across) vary from pinkish to white or purplish in colour and are borne singly in the leaf forks. Its yellow or orange fruit (1.5-4 cm long) are partially enclosed by the persistent, deeply-divided, sticky floral bracts.

Stinking Passionflower. Photo by J Brew

Protecting Queensland's Cultural Heritage

Project focus
Cultural heritage

Project partners
FNPW & National Parks Association of Queensland Inc.

Location
Queensland

Thanks to your support, the indigenous and non-indigenous cultural heritage sites of 10 of Queensland's state forests will be identified. This will also provide a strong additional rationale for the permanent protection of this land as National Park. Volunteers, under the watch of scientists from the Queensland Museum, can contribute to this important work. Before, these important heritage sites in stood unacknowledged and unprotected. Now they will be added to the National Heritage Register, and provide excellent justification for the gazettal of new National Parks.

Putting the Brakes on Tassie Devil Roadkill

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & Wildlife Safety Solutions

Location
Tasmania

Thanks to your support, game-changing new roadkill prevention technology is being trialled, particularly to prevent the deaths of Tasmanian Devils. Tassie Devils are endangered, their numbers plummeting from the horrific Devil Facial Tumour Disease. Before, an estimated 1,700 devils were being killed on roads each year, with any young in pouches or in dens secondary victims. Now, this new technology could see an 80% reduction in roadkill and a brighter future for this iconic Australian animal.

Quolls Around the Monaro

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & NSW National Parks and Wildlife

Location
Monaro, NSW

The Spotted-tailed Quoll is the largest native marsupial carnivore left on the Australian mainland. Its population has declined to the point where it occupies just 50% of its original pre-European range. Commencing in autumn 2016, a new project funded by FNPW will aim to survey for the species in such landscapes, including private tenures, to establish where quolls still occur. To read more about this project please visit this link.

Rehabilitation of Phillip Island to support the translocation of green parrots

Project focus
Land & water conservation

Project partners
FNPW & Parks Australia: Norfolk Island National Park

Location
Phillip Island, Norfolk Island National Park

Thanks to your support, degraded habitat will be restored on Phillip Island due to the construction of an on-island nursery for endemic and threatened plants. A sense of ownership will grow as community members participate in running the nursery, propagating, and planting on Phillip Island. Before this, Phillip Island (6 km off Norfolk Island) was been stripped of plants and topsoil by introduced rabbits, pigs, and goats. Now that the introduced animals have been eradicated, the nursery means significant revegetation work can return the island to good habitat for threatened species, such as the Norfolk Island Green Parrot.

Rising from the Ashes - the Feather-leaved Banksia

Project focus
Land & water conservation

Project partners
FNPW & WA Department of Parks and Wildlife

Location
Albany, Western Australia

Thanks to your support, the critically endangered Feather-leaved Banksia Banksia brownii will receive much needed conservation attention. Banksias don't live forever, they get old and susceptible to disease. They need fire to release seeds and recruit new plants. This population of Feather-leaved Banksia is in major decline due to a lack of fire, and a regeneration burn is needed to save it. Post-fire, the local community can help monitor the recovery of this plant. Before, this critically endangered plant was on the way out. Now, it can rise from the ashes.

Seagrass Dispersal by Dugongs and Green Sea Turtles

Project focus
Land & water conservation

Project partners
FNPW & James Cook University

Location
Far North Queensland

Thanks to your support, research is underway into the link between endangered Green Sea Turtles, vulnerable Dugongs, and seagrass, to increase survival rates for all. Floods and cyclones wiped out 98% of the seagrass meadows between Cairns and Townsville (over 400 km!) in 2010-11, which saw a more than double increase in annual dugong and sea turtle deaths in 2011-12. Now research is underway to determine how far and effectively these marine mega-herbivores can disperse seagrass, so meadows at risk of the longest natural recovery times can be prioritised for restoration. This will mean better survival rates for dugongs and turtles.

Securing Endangered Pomaderris Plants from Extinction

Project focus
Land & water conservation

Project partners
FNPW & Australian National Botanic Gardens

Location
Australian Capital Teritory

Thanks to your support, two endangered Australian plant species will be secured for the future. The best method for growing these two Pomaderris plants will be determined, and resources of seeds and plants from these species will be built up. Animals like the Powerful Owl, Masked Owl, Eastern Bent-winged Bat, Yellow-bellied Glider, and Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby benefit from these Pomaderris species. Before, these plants faced extinction, with no viable way to grow these plants ex-situ. Now, these Pomaderris species will be conserved.

Sharing the Stories of Currango Homestead

Project focus
Cultural heritage

Project partners
FNPW & NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service

Location
Kosciuszko National Park, New South Wales

Thanks to your support, the stories of Australia's largest and most intact snow-belt homestead, Currango, will become accessible to visitors. This NSW State Heritage Registered site is a locus of early twentieth century high plains challenges, lifestyles and working conditions for Aboriginal people and early European settlers. Before, these significant memories and experiences were fading away. Now we can hear the stories of the past from this remarkable site.

Sharing the Stories of Trial Bay Gaol

Project focus
Cultural heritage

Project partners
FNPW & NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service

Location
South West Rocks, New South Wales

Thanks to your support, the moveable heritage collection of the Trial Bay Gaol Museum in Arakoon National Park will enter the modern age. Volunteers will work alongside Parks staff to digitise the collection, with a Registrar overseeing to ensure the data entry is accurate and to industry standard. Before some 8,000 remarkable objects, photographs and documents were at risk of being damaged, and could not be displayed all at once. Now they will be safe, accessible, and better able to share the stories of our past.

Strengthening Mallefowl Conservation Efforts

Project focus
Threatened Species

Project partners
FNPW & National Malleefowl Recovery Group Inc

Location
Australia wide

Thanks to your support, conservation efforts for the vulnerable Malleefowl will receive a significant boost. The National Malleefowl Recovery Coordinator position will continue to be funded, to coordinate volunteers undertaking Mallefowl monitoring on 3 million hectares of private properties across four states. Before, there was no single, coordinated approach to Mallefowl conservation across the country. Now, Mallefowl have a better chance at increasing their numbers.

 

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GIVE YOUR GIFT

Help fund Australian conservation

Your donation safeguards wilderness and wildlife for future generations.

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